Motivation, self-efficacy and learning strategies of university students participating in work integrated learning

This study examined differences in the psychological constructs of motivation, academic self-efficacy, and learning strategies between higher education students who participated in a work-integrated learning (WIL) programme and those who did not. Undergraduate WIL (n = 1048) and non-WIL (n = 656) students in all years of study and from several academic faculties, completed the Motivated Strategies for Learning Questionnaire (MSLQ), which measures the constructs of motivation, academic self-efficacy and use of learning and study strategies. Results revealed that students who do not gain practical work experience while pursuing their studies have lower grade-point averages, are more likely to use shallow learning strategies, and are more extrinsically motivated compared to students who do gain work experience through a WIL programme. Differences in academic self-efficacy as a function of WIL were not found, however, significant relationships between self-efficacy, motivation, learning strategies, academic performance and anxiety did emerge. Implications and recommendation for future research are provided.

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